Little thoughts: Pray in Public

*Recently, I’ve found that I have a lot of topics for posts, but very little material to expand on them.  So I figured, at least for now, I would create a little series where I just put these “little thoughts” out into the world., rough cut and short.*

Pray in public.

Pray when you go out to dinner.  Pray when you’re eating a picnic.  Pray when you’re with friends.  Pray when you’re with your family.  Pray when you’re on a date.

Praying in public is a very vulnerable expression of faith.  I know, as Christians, we need to be bold about our faith.  But I’m more comfortable with wearing a shirt from Walk in love. and posting verses and praise songs on my social media, than I am with praying in public.

It’s vulnerable because you are allowing yourself to immediately be judged and criticized.  In an active form of faith, you are putting your guard down and opening the door for attacks.

But.  Pray in public.

Do it.

Still your hands, bow your head, close your eyes, and verbally pray to God.  Show the world who you are thanking and praising.

Let me tell you: It’s a way cool thing to pray with my boyfriend when we’re out to eat.  It’s something I’m not used to, and it’s strengthening my relationship with God.

Be bold, and pray in public.

Pray out loud.

Don’t make a show of it, and don’t demand attention.

But pray.

Pray in public, because you don’t know who may need to see, or hear, it.

Last night, some of my friends and I went to a local Friendly’s for dinner.  When our food came, we prayed together.  As we ate, we goofed off and had fun.  And a good bit of time into our meal, one of the surrounding tables got up, and one of the patrons walked over to us.  It was an older woman, and she told us that she saw us praying.  She said it made her really happy to see the younger generation still praying and being connected to God.  She concluded by saying we had blessed her heart, and made her night.

That made us all really happy, and shocked.  Something as simple as praying, and praying in public, had such an impact on a complete stranger.

I will say it again; pray in public.

Don’t let the fear of being judged keep you from praising and thanking God.  He deserves more than that.

Pray.

 

 

Get to know me: 25 “facts” about me

Hello there! It seems like its been quite some time since I’ve sat down and truly wrote out a post.  I’m in a bit of an inspirational rut at the moment, and there’s also a post or two I’m way behind on posting. (The series of books I’m reading each month, anyone?)

But I figured, as a way to re-inspire myself to write, why not *properly* introduce myself?  I think this could be fun, and I’d love to know your responses and reactions to some of these things! I’d love to know a few “facts” about you, too.

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1. I will be a junior in college in the fall, and I am currently working on my Bachelor’s degree in Psychology.  I plan on getting my Master’s at some point in the future, with a focus on providing therapy for kids with special needs.  And ultimately, I hope to use that to complete a Doctorate degree.

2. My family has two cats, and well, I’m well on my way to being a crazy cat lady.  I kinda really like cats …..

3.  I play the flute and piccolo, and have for many years.  But it’s on my Bucket list to play the violin, or rather, to make it weep.  I absolutely love the sound of a weeping violin.

4.  I do not handle needles or similar things well at all.  Yesterday, I had to get a TB test, and came really close to passing out.  I had to lay on the floor with my feet above my head.  The same thing happens when I have to get blood drawn ….. so that’s fun.

5.  I am a Christian, and more specifically, Brethren in Christ.  I was born in the church, raised in the church, and Imma die in the church.  However, as you can probably tell, I’m totally not against talking to people of other religions and beliefs; in fact, I think it’s rather important.  I was even at a Jewish synagogue last fall for one of my classes … that was really cool.

6.  I love Tim Burton movies.  I could very easily write essays on the complex beautiful themes in some of them.  And don’t even get me started on the incredible-ness that happens when he teams up with Helena Bonham Carter and Johnny Depp and Danny Elfman.  My goodness, so good.

7.  I can’t stand sappy Nicholas Sparks-esque romance movies, or even really dumb chick flick movies.  Period.  Also, I’ve never seen Titanic.  No shame.

8.  I read predominately classics.  My two most favorite books are classics (Jane Eyre and Les Misérables), and most of the books on my shelf are as well.  Also, I have never read The Hunger Games, The Fault in Our Stars, Twilight, the Divergent series, or any other popular book …. they’re not really my cup of tea.  However, I am a sucker for The Lunar Chronicles by Marissa Meyer.  They are so good.

9.  I wear very little makeup on a daily basis, and I really don’t understand how some girls have the time to go through the “normal/expected” makeup routine.  Like seriously, I ain’t got time for that ….

10.  My favorite movies include the Pirates of the Carribbean movies, the Bourne movies, classic Disney movies, anything Time Burton, Pride and Prejudice (with Colin Firth and Jennifer Ehle), and Jane Eyre (with Toby Stephens and Ruth Wilson).

11.  I am a big fan of oldies music.  I really enjoy Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Ella Fitzgerald, Louie Armstrong, Nina Simone, Etta James, Elvis, and some Motown.  I honestly cannot tell you any of the songs on Billboards Top 100 ….. And ya know, I’m absolutely fine with that …. Ignorance is bliss right?

12.  Beyoncè greatly annoys me.  Really badly.  Also, so does Miranda Sings … and Amy Shummer …… We’ll leave it at that ….

13.  I love big wild thunderstorms.  Where I live, my house has a pretty good view, so when a storm rolls in, we can see the glorious clouds rolling together.  I love the feel of powerful thunder and sweeping winds and blinding lightening … it makes my soul feel alive …..

14.  When I fall asleep or need to seriously de-stress or relax, I use ASMR videos on YouTube …. I promise, this is nothing weird, but it’s still very unknown …..

15.  My favorite time of the year is the fall – my birthday is in November, right before Thanksgiving.  But I love the smells and the memories and traditions.  Halloween is one of my favorite holidays, because of the memories of carving pumpkins and dressing up.  But I also love Thanksgiving and the anticipation of Christmas.  Plus, I’m kind of a sucker for Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade …..

16.  I am right-handed.  Also, I don’t wear contacts or glasses.  And I’v never had braces.  Nor do I need to get my wisdom teeth out ….

17.  Generally speaking, I feel rather self-centered when I’m constantly changing my Facebook profile picture.  For awhile there, my picture us of my back, or of me doing something I loved.  I’m of the mindset that the profile picture should be a visual representation of who you are, and I believe I am more than a face.  Does that make sense?

18.  Here’s a secret: I’m in a relationship.  Gasp, I know.  But one of the things that’s really important to me, is to not flood my social media with coupley pictures, or to obsess over each other publicly.  I won’t be posting a picture of us, until our sixth month mark, and even then, it won’t be sappy.  That’s all to say, I can’t stand Public Internet Displays of Affection.

19.  I put a lot of stock in pinky promises.

20.  I could spend way too much money buying trinket trays, journals, and antique Victorian-style chairs.  It’s bad ….

21.  I can understand basic Spanish.  I can understand, and speak, some complex Italian.  I can understand basic ASL.  My goal is to become completely fluent in one of those three.

22.  I cannot sleep unless my closet doors are closed.  I’m not afraid of the dark, but I’m afraid of what my mind thinks in the dark sometimes.

23.  Spiders and snakes don’t really scary; they just kind of unnerve me.  However, I have two really big fears.  First, I’m terrified of getting to Heaven and feeling like I’ve disappointed God, feeling that I didn’t do enough with this life.  Also, I’m terrified of a natural disaster happening, and my family not being together.  That really scares me …….

24.  I love to camp.  I love being up close and personal with nature and being away from WiFi for a week or so.  It really helps my soul ….

25.  I don’t like coffee, but I love how it smells.  Also, I drink mostly water.  It’s actually quite rare I drink anything else.

Hi, I’m Julia, and that’s just a bit about me.  Nice to meet you. 🙂

 

Religion and Politics: Survey Results

*I want to dedicate this post to every single person who completed my survey.  Your responses helped me test my hypotheses, and understand the relationship between religion and politics.  I am forever grateful to every single one of you.  Thank you.*

I started this study with the aim to analyze the connection between religious beliefs and political beliefs.  I was interested to see if the strength of one set of beliefs influenced the strength of the other.  This was my main hypothesis.  However, as I began compiling my survey, I became curious of other variables, and their effects.  Did age play a role?  What about gender?  If someone isn’t religious, does that impact which political party they most agree with?  Does different religious beliefs affect politics?  Does religious beliefs influence more conservative or more liberal beliefs?  And finally, does the amount of time one set of beliefs was held, impact the other?

I believed these variables would be statistically significant (important, statistically unique, different than normal).  I thought the stronger someone believed one set of beliefs, the stronger the other set of beliefs would be.  For example, I thought that if a Christian held very strong beliefs, they would also be a very strong, conservative Republican.  (This was based on prior observations and patterns.).  I thought age and gender played a role in each set of beliefs, but I was unsure to that role.  I thought the type of religious belief, be it religious or non-religious, would have an impact, but I was unsure what that was.  And I thought people that had beliefs from their family for one belief, would hold the other for the same reason.

Several prior studies influenced my knowledge prior to analyzing the results.  For example, a study conducted by Driskell, Embry, and Lyon (2008) suggested that religious beliefs about an involved God and many world issues are significantly related to political participation on a national scale (Driskell, Embry & Lyon).  Another study conducted by Evans (2014) concluded that religious people tend to disagree in terms of political policies, but they have the tendency to agree with the process of reaching those policies (Evans).  Friesen and Ksiazkiewicz (2015) concluded that society functions the best when people follow traditional values, and also was able to conclude that individuals tend to interpret religion as an important guide for one’s life (Friesen and Ksiazkiewicz).  Fitzgerald and Wickwire (2012) were able to conclude that people of specific religious and political groups tend to favor, or express more trust towards others of the same groups (Fitzgerald and Wickwire).  Finally, Meyer, Tope, and Price (2008) concluded that nations of people who tend to be strongly religious are less favorable towards democracy (Meyer, Top & Price).

A total of 193 people responded to my survey.  However, of the responses, 20 responses were discarded.  These responses did not meet all the criteria, such as being 18 or older, or not providing all information.  (All the surveys were completed.  However, 18 of the 20 responses chose not to specify their religious affiliation.  This was an optional spot, but was a factor I was interested in examining.). I chose 18 as the minimal age, because in America, that is the age when teenagers are allowed to vote.  The vast majority of participants were female and between the ages of 18-30.

Of the participants who identified as religious, the vast majority specified their beliefs as “Christian” (non-denominational/ denominational).  However, I also received responses such as “Catholic”, “Spiritual”, “Norse”, “Methodist”, “Mennonite”, “Christo-pagan”, “Baptist”, “Lutheran”, “Jewish”, “Former Mormon”, and even “Catholic with Celtic beliefs”.  Of those that identified as non-religious, the most common responses were “Agnostic” and “Atheist”.

Politically, I asked participants which political party they most aligned with, and then asked them to place themselves on a conservative/liberal scale.  I was interested to see if religious beliefs affected that ranking.

When gathering the responses, I was really focused on not getting a biased sample, such as too many millennials, or too many Christians, or too many Republicans, etc.  (Given where I live, those would have been the most likely biases.). So, I placed my survey on my Facebook page, and thus it was shared by many of my friends.  I also linked it in several of my blog posts.  Finally, I asked one of my previous professors to pass it out to his students.  The responses were kept completely anonymous, apart from asking for age and gender.

I was expecting my sample to slightly biased, with more Republican Christians.  However, I was surprised to find that the split between Republican and Democrat beliefs to be rather equal.

When I had finished analyzing my results, I was disappointed to find my hypotheses were generally not statistically significant. *I’ll apologize here: I seem to have deleted the file with all my graphs and whatnot.  So, unfortunately, I am unable to share with you any of the visual data.*. The strength between religious beliefs and political beliefs was not statistically significant. (For those of you interested, r=-.087.). This was fascinating to me, as I could see participants of similar religious beliefs rating the strength of that belief very high, but then ranking their political beliefs differently and opposite ends of the spectrum.  Also, I saw many responses where on set of beliefs was ranked high, and the other was ranked low.

The effects between “religious and political beliefs” and “gender” were not statistically significant, and neither was the interaction between them.  This was interesting, because based on previous patterns and observations, I expected females to be more religious, but also slightly more liberal.

When I analyzed the interaction between “religious beliefs”, “political beliefs”, and “age”, the interaction was not statistically significant.  However, when I analyzed the main effect of “religious beliefs” on “age”, this was statistically significant.  (For those interested, F (4, 170)= 2.76, p = .03, and h2 = 0.024.).

Finally, I analyzed the relationship between “religious beliefs” and “political beliefs”.  This correlation was mildly statistically significant (r = .19 at p = .013).  This was interesting, because it demonstrated there is indeed a relationship between “religious beliefs” and “political beliefs”.

*Unfortunately, I did not quite get the chance to analyze all the varied variables I wanted to, such as the different types of beliefs against political beliefs, or how long those beliefs were held against the strength of the beliefs.  If I have the chance to re-do this study, I would fine tune the variables I want to explore.  I made the mistake of adding more and more “variables” as my study went on.  I didn’t start with a strict set of things to investigate, and I think that is why so many of potentially interesting insights were ignored.  I ran out of time, and to a degree, resources, thus negatively effecting the validity of my results.*

I think, overall, this study brings some really interesting things to light.  For example, I began to understand that the interpretation of religious texts is often more impactful than just the religious beliefs.  There were participants who were nearly identical in religious beliefs and in their belief strength (sometimes even in age and gender), but completely opposite in terms of political beliefs and conservative/liberal ranking.  (I may even be so bold as to say that it is this split in interpretation that is leading to the split in Christians today …… corresponding blog post to come …..)

Also, it is also possible that race, economic status, and living environment (rural, city, urban, etc.) further impact the relationship between religious and political beliefs.

———————

I had quite a lot of fun organizing this study, analyzing the results, and understanding real life applications.  It has opened the door to many other questions I would like to pursue, and may at some point.

I’d love to know your thoughts about these results.  Do you think there is a bigger connection between religious beliefs and political beliefs?  Or do you think it’s smaller?


 

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Ciao for now,

Julia

P.S. I am interested in do a post on modesty, but from guys’ perspectives.  If you are a single, or yet unmarried Christian guy, I’d be honored if you’d fill out this short questionnaire.  Please pass it around to your friends! I will be giving credit where credit is due! Thank you!

I do something rather unglamorous.

I do something unglamorous.

And honestly, I love every minute of it.

At my church, I am part of a program that works to provides aide and help for kids with disabilities, while also creating a safe and inclusive space for them to learn and grow.  I have been a part of this group for at least three years.  And for the duration of those years, I have been a one-on-one to a little girl with Down Syndrome.  (I will be calling her PG throughout this post, as PG stands for “pretty girl”, which is my nickname for her.)

When I started with her, I had little to no experience working with kids with special needs.  I had babysat a group of kids several times prior, with one of the children being on the Autism Spectrum, but that was it.  PG used mostly ASL, had poor use of words,  used braces on her feet, and was honestly a challenge for me when I started.  She will be in first grade this coming school year, and my goodness, how she was grown.  She uses little to no sign, her word usage is incredible, she can write her name and her hand writing is beautiful, and her manners are improving everyday.

Working with kids with special needs is a very unglamorous job.  My hands, arms, and sometimes my legs, have been covered in marker.  My clothes sometimes get covered in drool and bits of chewed food.  Most recently, I had a white shirt get covered in Oreo slobber.  I have had my hair pulled, my fingers bent back the wrong way, and I’ve been pinched and kicked.  I have even had things thrown at me, or I’ve had to block things that were thrown. I have been (very unintentionally) choked, and at times I become a human jungle gym.  There was a period of time where PG liked to bang her head against my chest, if she was sitting in my lap.  And more often than not, working with kids with special needs is a full contact sport.  There are a few kids at my church that don’t like touch, but the vast majority of kids in the program do.  And more often than not, physical touch is used help restrain.  PG is a runner, so I spend time running after her, restraining her, and physically bringing her back to the task at hand.

The past three days were VBS (Vacation Bible School) at my church.  On one of the evenings, PG had diarrhea very early on in the evening.  (It was due to something she ate, and her parents were fine that she stay for the rest of the evening.). However, she got a little in her underpants, and for the rest of the evening, she kept trying to put her hands in her pants.  And though I washed my hands many times with soap and water, by the end of the evening, I smelled like diarrhea.

And all of the parents of the kids in this program, and all of the volunteers who work with the kids, undoubtedly have similar stories to tell.

I want it to be noted, though, that a lot, if not all, of the unglamorous traits of helping kids with disabilities, are simply traits of working with kids.  Working with kids really, of any age group and in any capacity, is beautifully messy.  Working with kids with special needs simply adds another layer of messy beauty.  Kids with special needs are still kids, dealing with the normal issues and challenges of being a kid, but with additional (and oftentimes individualized) traits that come with their diagnosis.

Working with kids with special needs is so unglamorous and frustrating and exhausting and messy and challenging and at times, exceedingly overwhelming.  It is even often a thankless job.  But.  It is the most rewarding thing I have ever done, and could ever do.

I love my PG.  She may not quite know my name, but she knows she is safe with me.  She knows my face and my voice, and she knows I am here to help her.  She knows she can have fun with me.  In fact, one of my most favorite things is when I can get her to belly laugh.  I love when she hears what I ask her to do and she does it.  I love when she can say “sorry” or “thank you” or “please” without prompting.  She loves to sing and dance, and I love when she sings along, or does the accompanying motions.  I love when she grabs my hand or sits in my lap spontaneously.  She loves to read, and will often “read” me a story, which I simply love. She loves big, gives great hugs, and will walk up to complete strangers and say “hi”.  She knows Jesus, and that makes me so happy.

In the hallway in the lower level of our church, we have a painting of Jesus, surrounded by the kids from our congregation that have passed away.  It’s a beautiful painting, and last night at VBS, PG stopped to look at it.  She pointed to Jesus, and said, “That’s Jesus.  He died.”. I was a bit taken back, but I said “Yes, you’re right.  But He’s not dead anymore, right?  He’s in Heaven.”.  She continued to look at the painting, nodded her head, and said “Yes.  That’s Jesus.”.  Then she grabbed my hand, and walked away.  That moment made my heart all kinds of happy.

And my most favorite story to tell about PG happened when I was feeling incredibly overwhelmed and stressed.  It was before she was in Kindergarten, so she was part of a class that had kids ages 3 to 5.  On this particular Sunday, there were four kids with disabilities; PG, her younger brother with intellectual disabilities, and identical twins with Autism, but with complete opposite preferences in terms of physical touch.  I was the only trained volunteer (for kids with disabilities) in the room at the time, and was feeling a bit overwhelmed.  There was another helper, who is absolutely incredible.  In a moment when the twins got angry and upset, this amazing helper was right beside me, trying to figure out which twin needed physical touch to calm down, and which didn’t.  It was also in this moment that PG‘s younger brother was stepping on kids and taking toys.  I began to get worried that PG would have a issue, and thus causing this helper and I to put a child under each arm, and get out of the room.  But as I stood up to make sure there weren’t any more issues, PG caught my eye, smiled really big, and started to sing “Jesus Loves Me”.  My heart pretty much overflowed.

Working with kids with special needs is hard. There are times I find myself frustrated and exasperated.  There are times I look for help, and I am learning it is totally okay to say “I need help right now; I can’t do this by myself”.  I make mistakes sometimes, and sometimes I make them a lot.  But I learn something new about PG everyday, and I learn new ways of helping her.  I have loved watching her grow and learn and blossom into the beautiful soul she is.

I do something unglamorous.

But I wouldn’t trade it for anything in the world.

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Let go and embrace His plan.

Hey guys, sorry its been a it.  I promise I am working on several posts; most notably the results from my survey.  But right now, I’m feeling really happy, and I don’t want to work on those posts.

Some of the major details I’d like to keep secret for awhile longer.  I’m feeling incredible happy, and my soul is singing, and I don’t want to do anything that could potentially ruin this.  But I am learning some really important things, and like all things, I wanted to share it with you.

I am learning, that in order to fully embrace what God is going to do in your life, you have to let go of certain expectations and plans you may place on Him. 

Let me explain.  I’ve been single for three-wish years. (I did date someone at the beginning of the year for two-ish months.  And because of that short duration, I consider it simply a tiny blimp on my “single” timeline.). And I’m getting to the point in my life where I’m beginning to think about my future and getting married.  So it would seem natural that I would be looking for a relationship, right?

Last year, when I applied for a summer position at a Christian camp, I thought for sure that I would meet the man of my dreams at the camp, and the rest would be history.  I began to place that desire on God, and I expected Him to follow through with it.  However, when I wasn’t offered a position, I thought God wasn’t keeping His promise.  I think I was more hurt by the fact that I wasn’t going to meet Godly men, and the future I had built before me involving a Godly man from camp wasn’t going to happen, than I was with the actual rejection.

When this past fall semester started, I had the same mentality; The man I am supposed to meet will be in one of my classes.  He wasn’t.  Then spring semester started.  Same thing.  Then I started a new job.  Still, I had the same mentality.  And as of right now, the same result.  I was beginning to think this illusive man would be at this college I’m transferring to in the fall.

But, well, all I’ll say, is sometimes, maybe, God has a different plan.

What I’m learning, is if I continue to place that expectation of meeting my Prince Charming at a certain place at a certain time on God, I may be missing out on His true plan for me.  I need to stop trying to confine God to what I think He should do, and when I think He should do it.  “I am not skilled to understand, what God has willed, what God has planned”, so why should I try to think I do?

I am also learning that nothing I do could ever screw up God’s plan for me.  Ever.  I am not that powerful.

I used to be so worried that the right guy would come along while I was in a relationship.  That while I was with one guy, the “right” guy would catch my eye.  I used to be so worried I would get stuck in between my timing and God’s timing.  I used think I had the ability to royally screw up God’s plan for me.  And I used to think anything I did in one relationship could directly affect my chances of meeting Mr. Right.

But I’m learning I am not a god, and therefore, I do not have the power, nor ability, to screw anything up.  I do not have the power to override God’s plan for me.  Nothing I do could ever cause God to change His mind about what He’s planned for me.  Everything I have ever done, and every relationship I have ever been in, or will be in, fits perfectly into God’s design for my life.  There is something so freeing in realizing that.

I am truly very happy.  I woke upon this morning in a wonderful mood, and have pretty much been smiling ever since.  And, I feel closer to God than I have in a long time.

Let go of any and all expectations you have of God, regarding your future, and embrace His plan.  I promise you, it is beautiful and better than anything you could ever imagine.

Ciao for now,

Julia

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Religion.

This wasn’t the post I had planned for this morning.  I was actually going to write something very different.

But before settling down to write, I stumbled upon a video by SoulPancake.  Those of you that have been with me for awhile know I really like this organization, and I often look to their book for prompt ideas.  This particular video is titled “Do we need religion?”, and well, it made me happy.

As a Christian, I believe it is important to hear other people’s perspective on religion.  I think it is important to understand why they believe what they believe.

Do we need religion?

You know, I think human beings, in their very essence, desire something to put their faith into.  People put faith in science, in reason, in other people, even in the human race, and in god-like deities.  And its from that faith that religion is born.  I understand religion to be the act living out that faith, and doing life with other people with the same faith.

I am not a Christian because my parents are, or because my grandparents are.  I’m not a Christian because I’ve been going to a church my whole life.  I am a Christian because I, myself, have faith that Jesus Christ is who He says He is.  I am a Christian because I, myself, have faith that the Bible is the living, breathing Word of God.  And I am a Christian because I, myself, believe in God.

Like many of the people in the video, I believe that religion helps people make sense of their world, and it adds meaning to their life.  And I believe that religions helps anchor people.  My life has felt rather messy and out-of-control at times, and other people can be really quite mean about religion (particular Christianity).  And when I question and doubt, sometimes seriously, there is always some indescribable thing that calms my mind and heart, and guides me back.  My faith in God and living out my Christian religion always seems to re-balance and re-settle me.

And I am sure that is the same for every other religion.

The conversation of religion always opens the door for “right” and “wrong” labeling.  I know some Christians who are content to adamantly claim other religions (or lack thereof) are wrong, and are more than willing to say so.  This is not meant to be a theological discussion, or a lesson on evangelism.  But no one wants to be told what they believe is wrong; they stop listening to what you have to say.

Yes, as a Christian, I believe my faith is “right”, and I believe that there is ample enough proof, outside of the Bible.  But Jews, Muslims, Hindus, Catholics, even Agnostics and Atheists believe their faith (or ideologies) are “right”.  If they didn’t believe that, they wouldn’t have faith in it, right?

I believe in God, and at my former job, I have a friend who believes there is no God.  We know each other’s beliefs, but we are still friends.  I think this is so important, because at the end of the day, we are just trying to understand our world, all the horrible, tragic, and good.

In Christian teachings, we are supposed to bring unbelievers to God, but we are supposed to do it through love.  We believe our faith has eternal consequences, and if we ask you to come to church with us, it isn’t (mainly) because we think what you believe is wrong.  We ask you because we love you and care about you, and we want to spend eternity with you.  We pray for you, because we love you.  We do life with you, because we care about you.  And we share our faith with you because we want you to experience Heaven with us.

Do we need religion?

I think so.  I think religion gives us hope.  It gives us something to look to when life gets hard and bad things seem to press in from every side.  It gives us something to put our trust in when people do bad things.

I think we need religion because we need faith.

What do you think?

Ciao for now,

Julia

(P.S. I apologized this felt rather unstructured.  These are my unfiltered thoughts.  Plus, the more I wrote, the more I realized I could probably split this topic into a few other posts.  We’ll see what happens.)

 

 

In Honor of Holy Week.

For Christians, this week is one of the most important times of the year.  Easter is the time we remember Jesus Christ’s death on the cross, and what His resurrection truly means.

This week, I am surrounding myself with religious songs and placing myself in the proper state of mind for Easter Sunday.  So, to respect that, and to focus as much as possible on Jesus’ sacrifice, my only other posts this week will be prevalent to Easter.  I am beginning to feel like Jesus is getting pushed to the side a bit in my life right now, and I want to re-focused myself on Him.

In honor of Holy Week, I want to leave you with this song.  We sang it in church yesterday, and it struck right at the heart.

Ciao for now,

Julia